Category Archives: Notes

NFTU #8 – A quotation from Lewis Baltz

Anyone can take pictures. What’s difficult is thinking about them, organising them, trying to use them, montage them in some way so that some… some… some meaning can be constructed out of them. That’s really where the work begins.”

– Lewis Baltz interviewed by Studio Arte for Contacts 2 (viewed on  vimeo, 5/10/17)


Which is pretty much why I signed up for the OCA in the first place, but articulated better than I could have at the time. Or now probably.

Worth keeping in mind.

(Thanks to Andrew Fitzgibbon for linking to the interview on the OCA discussion forum)

 

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NFTU #6 – close-ups and printing size

An article in today’s Guardian by poet Lydia Towsey opens: ‘Botticelli’s painting of the Birth of Venus was the first female nude painted and exhibited life size.’

james; waulkmill, 2017

The rest of the article – about body image and eating disorders and the way being the subject of portraiture can help recovery from them – has a lot more in it to consider, but it was the phrase ‘life size’ that captured my immediate attention. Continue reading

August Sander – A Postscript

In my earlier post discussing August Sander’s comprehensive study of German ‘types’ made in the first half of the 20th century, I limited myself to the sixty plates included in the 1929 book, Face of our Time at least in part because this was the only part of Sander’s wider project where he had been in complete control of how it was presented.

As I looked for copies of the images I wanted to use to illustrate my post, I realised that the pictures included in the book had often been cropped from wider – sometimes much wider – original images. For example, the Shepherd – Pl.2 in the book –  has been cropped down from a wider composition, concentrating the picture’s depiction of it’s subject’s lined face and removing extraneous detail.

fig.1 – Unemployed (pl.60) as shot

Mostly, the cropping of the images for publication simply concentrates the meaning of the original, but, in at least one instance – Unemployed (Pl.60) – the effect is completely changed. Continue reading

Glossary – Collodion Process

After its simultaneous discovery by Frederick Scott Archer and Gustave le Gray in 1851, the collodion process for producing wet-plate negatives quickly superseded the earlier Daguerrotype and Calotype methods for capturing images. Glass Collodion negatives were more sensitive to light (meaning that they required shorter exposures) than either of the older processes and were capable of finer detail than the grainy paper negatives that were used for Calotypes. Continue reading

NFTU #5 – bona fides

business card design # 1 – based on a template by moo.com; other online business card manufacturers are available.

Thinking forward to the sort of work I’m likely to be producing during Identity and Place, I realise that there’s going to be quite a lot of photographing people who I don’t know. In the past, people have often asked why I want to take their picture and then, when I’ve said why, whether I have a card or some other proof that I’m not just some random idiot with a camera. It therefore seems a good idea to get some cards made up. Continue reading

NFTU #3 – Nikki Bird + Beneath the Surface

bidston-2-colour-edit

Scapa Court, Kirkwall (KW15 1BJ) in 1968/69 and in 2016

‘[Showing] the relationship between the past and the present […] so it’s not just “the past is over here and the present is over here” and that is it’

– Nicky Bird, interviewed on video for the Stills Centre of Photography in Edinburgh

While I was doing some reading on Nikki Bird for part 5 of C&N (around Question for Seller), I came across a later piece called Beneath the Surface, where Bird had worked with people whose part of Scotland had been “wiped away” to combine their photographs with up to date pictures of the places in the pictures. At the time when she first started thinking about this, she had been involved with an archaeological dig in Edinburgh.

Bugger! I thought. Continue reading